EDUCATION REFORM  
 
 
 
 

Youth Outreach

Introducing school kids to adult/youth gay clubs in local communities.

Probably the fastest and most effective way that school children are introduced to homosexual behavior is through adult-youth community gay clubs, which are run by homosexual adults and seek to attract local high school and middle school children.

Community youth clubs: Mixing school kids with adult LGBT members.

Unlike the gay clubs inside the schools, which are supervised. These adult/youth gay clubs meet at various places in the community and are completely unsupervised by any outside entity. Fortunately, schools know this and are still cooperative in steering school children to these clubs, where the kids develop relationships with the adult members. In our experience, the school authorities do not see any legal issues when introducing school children to these adult/youth groups.

If you would like to participate in this youth organization, please contact:

W A G L Y           West Suburban Alliance of Gay Lesbian Youth

Phone: (508) 875-2122

on the web    http://wagly.org/

WAGLY meetings are held every Monday evening from 6:45 to 8:30 pm (except on school vacation weeks and holidays). Umbrella meetings are held on the first Wednesday and third Thursday of every month from 6:45 to 8:30 pm (again, except on school vacation weeks and holidays).


 
 
 

Common Core

Successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards requires parents, educators, policymakers, and other public officials to have the facts about what the standards are and following the development, intent, content, and implementation of the standards.

The Common Core standards are designed to build upon the most advanced current thinking about preparing all students for success in college, career, and life. This will result in moving even the best state standards to the next level. In fact, since this work began, there has been an explicit agreement that no state would lower its standards. The standards were informed by the best in the country, the highest international standards, and evidence and expertise about educational outcomes. We need college- and career-ready standards because even in high‐performing states, students are graduating and passing all the required tests but still need remediation in their postsecondary work.

Standards from top-performing countries played a significant role in the development of the math and English language arts/literacy standards. In fact, the college- and career-ready standards provide an appendix listing the evidence that was consulted in drafting the standards, including the international standards that were consulted in the development process.

The Common Core standards recognize that both content and skills are important.

The English language arts standards require certain critical content for all students, including classic myths and stories from around the world, America’s founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Appropriately, the remaining crucial decisions about what content should be taught are made at the state and local levels. In addition to content coverage, the standards require that students systematically acquire knowledge in literature and other disciplines through reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

The mathematics standards lay a solid foundation in whole numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, and decimals. Taken together, these elements support a student’s ability to learn and apply more demanding math concepts and procedures. The middle school and high school standards call on students to practice applying mathematical ways of thinking to real-world issues and challenges. They prepare students to think and reason mathematically. The standards set a rigorous definition of college and career readiness not by piling topic upon topic, but by demanding that students develop a depth of understanding and ability to apply mathematics to novel situations, as college students and employees regularly do.

The Common Core standards were drafted by public officials and teachers from across the country and are designed to ensure students are prepared for today’s entry-level careers, freshman-level college courses, and workforce training programs. The Common Core focuses on developing the critical-thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills students will need to be successful. Forty-three states, the District of Columbia, four territories, and the Department of Defense Education Activity have voluntarily adopted and are moving forward with the standards

The new Common Core also provide a way for teachers to measure student progress throughout the school year and ensure that students are on the pathway to success in their academic careers.

 
 
 
 
 
Resources
 
Common Core
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
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